Can Kegel Exercises Really Help Prevent Uterine Prolapse?

The number of American women who suffer from uterine prolapse isn’t precisely known. Studies show numbers ranging from 11-40%, and since the severity of symptoms varies between women, many may not even be aware of the problem.

Uterine prolapse is typically related to stretched and weakened pelvic muscles, and it’s often related to pregnancy and childbirth. As a conservative therapy, Kegel exercises are often mentioned as a preventive measure. In this blog, the health specialists at Southeast Urogyn look at the role Kegels can play in preventing or treating uterine prolapse.

Problems associated with uterine prolapse

Because of the body systems in the pelvis, uterine prolapse can have wide-ranging effects. Problems with bowel movements and urinary incontinence are common, as are sensations related to the shifting of uterine tissue. You may feel pelvic heaviness. Your uterus could also affect the shape and position of your vagina.

Having one or more vaginal deliveries can increase your chances of developing prolapse, since vaginal deliveries can weaken the tissues that support the pelvic organs. Other factors can cause or contribute to the problem as well. Chronic issues with coughing or constipation can put a strain on pelvic support tissues, as can carrying extra body weight or working at a job that requires lots of heavy lifting.

The role of Kegel exercises

Pelvic organs are held in place by connective tissues and muscles of the pelvic floor. When connective tissues weaken and fail, it’s often possible for the pelvic floor muscles to increase their support role, though it takes training to improve muscle tone and strength. You can work out your pelvic floor muscles by performing Kegel exercises.

Better still, Kegels can be done virtually anywhere. As you build strength, symptoms associated with uterine prolapse can subside, and you can also halt the progression of the condition.  Depending on how advanced your case is, Kegels may be your primary care therapy or part of a management plan.

Incorporating Kegels into your lifestyle

Working with uterine prolapse specialists, such as the ones at Southeast Urogyn, is the best way to learn about the role that Kegels can play in your life. Your urogynecologist can explain how Kegels exercises work and how they may be combined with other treatments.

A full set of Kegel repetitions takes less than five minutes to perform, and experts recommend performing at least three sets a day. It’s normal to start slowly, just as you would with any exercise designed to build muscle strength.

If you think you may have uterine prolapse or want to learn how Kegels exercises can treat or prevent it, book an appointment online over the phone with Southeast Urogyn today.

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